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Evaluating News: Digital Etiquette

This LibGuide provides resources to help you identify fake news and evaluate news and disinformation.

Digital Etiquette (Netiquette)

Digital etiquette is the basic rules of conduct users of technology should follow in order to be responsible citizens online. We should all use good manners which include using appropriate behavior and making good choices when we are in the digital world. These manners include:

  1. Be respectful online
    • Think about who can see or read what you are sharing or posting. Do not bully or gossip.
  2. Think twice before your post
    • Watch your language. Words, sarcasm, and humor can be easily taken out of context. Would you want your parents, grandparents, or boss to see or read what you are posting?
  3. Never plagiarize
    • Use proper quotes. Do not quote out of context or only use part of a quote. Do not steal someone else's words or images.
  4. Double check before you hit send
    • Do not share or repost fake news. Verify information and get the facts first.
  5. Remember grammar rules
    • A message to your teacher or boss should reflect your best grammar and spelling.
  6. Ask permission before you post someone else's personal information or images.
  7. Do not respond to negative and nasty messages or comments
    • Beware of online trolls on message boards. All they want to do is start arguments.
  8. Never type in all capital letters. That means you are shouting.
  9. Put your device down when someone else is speaking to you.
  10. Put your device on silent when in a theater, church, class, library, etc.

Before you post, remember the golden rule. Ask yourself if what you are posting or sharing is true, is it helpful, is it necessary, and is it kind.

Every time that you post something online, you leave a permanent digital footprint. You may think you have deleted a post or image, but someone may have already shared it, downloaded it, or copied it. What you say and do online today may negatively affect your future education or employment. Universities and businesses peruse the internet before accepting students or hiring employees.

Digital Etiquette

Think Before You Post

Manners Matter